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Beware Of ‘Guaranteed’ Job Scams In The Realm Of Content Writing!

Team Creatie

More and more people are flocking to writing gigs than ever before because they think they could do well in a flexible environment that doesn’t limit their creativity.


After all, only content writers know the joy of watching the narrative transform into something truly meaningful and impactful. And with digital marketing paving the way forward, most brands rely on content writers to give them a unique voice that resonates with their intended audience.


But here’s the thing: Most content writers enter the profession for their love for the written words. While it won’t hurt if you have the best of degrees in English, Mass Communication, Journalism, etc., these aren’t mandatory for a job or a freelance gig in content writing.


As long as you’re a good wordsmith, you can get started with just your laptop and a decent internet connection. And while most experienced professionals understand this, newbies probably don’t.


But we’re not here to judge. We get how intimidating it can be to find work as a beginner in this field, especially given its ever-changing nature.


We’ve been there, and we’ve really seen it all because we’ve been a part of the industry for so many years now. But in all this time, the one thing that has surprised us is just how many scammers have penetrated the market.


And that’s what this blog is about!


Today, we want to make it absolutely clear that there is no such thing as a “guaranteed” writing job.


The Duality Of The Digital World

Who doesn’t put their best foot forward to secure a job in today’s world?


We’ve all seen those incredibly innovative resumes that have gone viral on Twitter and Facebook. But let’s be real — those tactics are much less effective for creative roles like content writing. That’s because you’ll be hired primarily for your ability to craft proper rhetoric than anything else.


Now, just as someone in the tech industry signs up for coding boot camps to work on their skills, many writers turn to content writing programmes to boost their resumes. These courses are usually designed to teach you the basics of content writing; you’ll learn more about the right SEO (search engine optimization) tactics, how to effectively edit your own work, and what to expect from content management systems like WordPress.


Content writers need the right tools in their arsenal to come up with the best work. That’s why opting for such a course, especially if it’s financially viable for you, isn’t always a bad thing.


But you should always be wary of buzzwords like “guaranteed jobs for content writing” or “assured freelance writing gigs upon completion” when you’re doing a freelance job search. That’s because such content writing courses aren’t always designed by professionals and industry experts under whom you will actually flourish.


Plus, most of these businesses are simply looking to make a quick buck off of struggling writers. Not all have the connections or the resources to tie up with credible platforms that offer the top content writing jobs. And frankly, what guarantee is there that these content writing courses can actually improve your writing skills in the first place?


To sum it up, you’ll just be shelling out a small fortune — yes, some of these courses can cost quite a bit — to be left stranded in the end. Keep in mind that not all that glitters is gold.


Other common job search scams actually come from social media, which is otherwise a haven for content writers!


Don’t Get Conned By Clever Marketing

Did you know that the global digital marketing software market, which includes email marketing, social media, and content management, is expected to grow to $141.84 billion in 2026?


In simpler words, all companies, vloggers, and influencers need to come up with a brilliant social media strategy if they want to create a successful legacy. And they won’t be able to sustain this without content writers.


But here’s the catch: Most so-called social media celebrities are actually conning young, naive aspirants to do free “internships” that reward people in “experience” as opposed to paying them. And we all know how such positions are just a way to obtain services for free – a massive red flag. That’s also why you should research the pay on different salary comparison websites if you’ve received such an offer; you’ll realise you’re getting the shorter end of the stick despite possessing the talent for it.


Others still, are trying to get prospective writers to join online or offline content writing programmes under the guise of “assured” freelancing writing gigs after completion. Some influencers even claim they’ll hire the best writers themselves.


But what do you think really happens?


The Dark Reality

We spoke to many people who had signed up for such services. Short of calling it an outright job scam, they told us how they were led down a rabbit hole when the content writing course ended, and there were no freelance writing gigs in sight.


These vloggers and influencers typically earned a commission through referrals and could not be held accountable for making fake promises later. Instead, the candidates were accosted for not being “good enough” to crack it in the industry.


And what does it say about the content writing program if it’s making false claims to its own students? Do you really think you’ll acquire the skills needed to land the top content writing jobs with the assistance of such companies?


Of course not!


And these, ladies and gentlemen, are just the reasons why you should steer clear of the scam of “guaranteed jobs” when it comes to content writing.


We’re not saying you shouldn’t sign up for classes if you think you need them to grow and build yourself and your portfolio. In fact, many credible platforms like Skillshare, Udemy, and even LinkedIn offer a host of videos, tutorials, guides, and tests that you can benefit from to get your dream job.


And if that’s not your forte, then you can find many free resources (think: YouTube) on the internet that’ll come in handy.


Just make sure that you do your due diligence before signing up for any classes, lest you fall prey to common job search scams in the future.


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